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  1. "Cosa sento! tosto andate", No. 7 from "Le Nozze di Figaro", Act 1, K492 (Full Score)
  2. Le nozze di Figaro libretto (English/Italian) - opera by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
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This reprise was probably On Monday 1May in the k. National Court Theater was performed for the first time : cut before the premiere, and was replaced by a simple recitative that contained a melodic Le nozze di Figaro, Die Hochzeit des Figaros, an Italian Singspiel in four acts. The music is reference to the tune of "Voi che sapete.

This piece, which was cut at some point during the original production.

"Cosa sento! tosto andate", No. 7 from "Le Nozze di Figaro", Act 1, K492 (Full Score)

This number evidently caused particular difficulty than the French. The most surprising and, something that they themselves have not made. Yet this section is marked what to think. I believe it is sufficiently well known that it was the third performance of this opera and the encores that were so frequently demanded in it that NB. In a letter to his daughter dated 18 May quasi divina tenuta.


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Sheppard, , amended ] Michael Kelly likewise mentions the many encores: Yet the opera was not a hit with every member of the audience. After attending the At the end of the opera, I thought the audience would never have done applauding and premiere. Count Zinzendorf wrote in his diary: calling for Mozart; almost every piece was encored, which prolonged it nearly to the length of two operas, and induced the Emperor to issue an order, on the second representation, At 7 in the evening to the opera, Le nozze di Figaro, the poetry by Da Ponte, the music bore witness.

Louise in our box; the opera bored me.. After the following the third performance not the second, as Kelly states Joseph II wrote to Count fifth performance on 4 July , he wrote: Rosenberg:. Le nozze di Figaro. In order that the length of the operas not be overly extended, but that the opera [ To the opera. The music of Mozart is odd, with hands but no singers not be deprived of the opportunity of seeking fame through the repetition of vocal head.

Figaro was not performed in Vienna in or , but the opera was revived there with significant revisions on 29 August No libretto for this production is known to survive, and dous success. On 12 December , the Prager Oberpostamtszeitung reported: it is possible that one was never printed. Mozart made several revisions for his new cast. Most importantly, he composed new arias for his new Susanna, Adriana Ferrarese del No piece so goes the general wisdom here has made such a sensation as the Italian opera Bene.

The music is by our famous but the evidence here is less clear. The paper-type in the autograph of K. Thus it may be that K. This must have reached the added to Figaro only later on in the run, perhaps in or even early in It is not entirely clear who sang the Mozart did, in fact, arrive in Prague on 11January In a letter written on 15January to role of the Count in the revival, and it almost certain that the role was taken by at least two his friend Gottfried von Jacquin, he reported that he had attended a ball on the day of his different singers over the course of the run; the two principal candidates to have sung the arrival: role in , Francesco Albertarelli and Francesco Morelia, both left the company of the court theater by the end of the season —90, and the role of the Count must have been —However, I watched with great pleasure how all these people leapt about with such sung by someone else Santi Nencini?

No or piped but—Figaro; no opera is attended but—Figaro and forever Figaro; certainly a great honor for me. Figaro was soon produced in two Italian cities with close connections to the Viennese court. In Figaro was produced in Florence, where and it may never have been in her possession. The autograph came into the possession the emperor's brother Leopold soon to succeed Joseph as emperor was Grand Duke. When the music collection of that library was removed from Berlin for of an unknown copyist.

A short autograph fragment in the National Library in Prague safe-keeping during the Second World War, the autograph of Figaro was divided. After contains a revised version of mm. The binding of the leaves for the first two acts autograph source known for the recitative preceding the finale of Act IV. The fate of the autograph of K. The leaves in this portion of the autograph were and a set of parts that may have been copied from the autograph around , and these also once bound together in a single volume, but this binding was removed in the s, and can be considered the primary sources for the piece in the absence of an autograph see the autograph currently consists of a collection of loose individual leaves and bifolia.

Because by Mozart while the ink was still wet , small cuts, and minor alterations to the Italian the manuscript was probably delivered piecemeal, Mozart carefully marked most of text. Some revisions are more consequential. As was his version of the Duettino of Susanna and Marcellina. Similar leaves containing the wind parts for the finale of Act IV have recently post-dates that of the recitative.

The second-act finale contains a significant number of been donated to the Juilliard School of Music, and are included in the present facsmile. The internal part writing and indications of the orchestration. As originally written, mm. The distinct levels of composition are also particularly obvious in the autograph were copied into the original horn parts for the performance before they were autograph of K. The individual items in the opera been copied.

These parts are likewise written into the separate wind parts in the orchestral parts. The aria. When final version. A recently discovered melodic were indeed added later on. These scores are by and large written by the same copyists and on many of the same paper-types found in the original working score of the opera.

Also from the copy shop of the court theater are original orchestral parts from the original production in , which also contain revisions a score and vocal parts purchased by Prince Esterhazy in for a planned production of and insertions from the revival in Surviving materials include complete full scores of continued to be made to the opera after Mozart delivered his score to the copyist. Although these manuscripts were copied in , discussed earlier in this introduction.

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Le nozze di Figaro libretto (English/Italian) - opera by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Dated entries into the orchestral parts by the players they reflect the production, and show none of the revisions made for the Viennese show that the parts continued to be used by the court theater throughout the nineteenth revival in A full score of Figaro from the copy shop of the court theater and dating century. Entries date from as late as , during Mahler's tenure as director of the opera.

The original parts were given to the court library York City. Other early scores of the opera, including scores in Berlin, Modena, London, around , and are now in the Austrian National Library. This score helps verify several of the revisions to the opera made during earliest Viennese productions. A full score of the opera in Florence has been claimed to the original production such as the revision of the third-act finale.

The original copy shop of the court theater at that time. It may reflect the content of a Viennese revival working score of the opera also gives insight into cuts and revisions in the simple recita- of Figaro in Italian in Columbus, Ohio, November All translations from German or French in the present introduction 8. The reviewer implies that other newspapers had published reports of the early performances of are by the author.

No such reports are known. Zinzendorf was as frequently happened not punctual in arriving at the opera. According to the 1. Michtner, , n. Because Figaros two arias were originally composed long before the premiere, it seems likely that first leaf is written on paper, probably the last one that Mozart used in composing the opera in early the revisions represent Mozart's second thoughts when returning to these arias several months spring , possibly indicating a late revision to that aria.

See Patricia Lewy Gidwitz, 5. Cited in Michtner, , n. The opera to which Paperback edition vols. Translated by L. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Leisinger , Kassel etc. Die Dokumente seines Lebens. Briefe und Aufzeichnungen. Bauer Deutsch, Kassel etc. I-IV: texts , Kassel etc. V-VI: commentary , Kassel etc.


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Vocally there is a lot to remember here: the glittering Susanna of Christiane Karg, the marvellously detailed and expressive Marcellina of Anne Sofie von Otter. Luca Pisaroni, Figaro, has a fine voice and is expressive with words. Verbally and expressively he is masterly. The scene with Susanna at the beginning of act III and his big aria that follows constitute a high-spot in this recording. August The Chamber Orchestra of Europe is marvelous -- the strings silky but capable of sharp-edged attacks, the winds alternately spicy and sweet, and their ensemble work impeccable.

This latest release is no exception. Christiane Karg as Susanna and Luca Pisaroni make an ideal pair in this performance, with especially impressive warm and solid low notes from Karg in the aria "Deh vieni non tardar. The most striking quality of this "Figaro" is the transparency of the orchestral sound, enabled by DG's use of multiple, closely placed mics.

It features a stellar cast. Christiane Karg proves a lively lynchpin as Susanna, her performance alert and bright. The same can be said of Luca Pisaroni, whose baritone is lithe and characterful. Thomas Hampson proves he still has plenty of voice, and his Conte sounds duly amorous, confused and menacing in turn.

Sonya Yoncheva turns in a grand Contessa.


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Maurizio Muraro hits just the right note as Bartolo. The COE play beautifully. Pisaroni's dark-toned Figaro is dangerous in "Se vuol ballare", bitter in "Aprite un po' quelgi occhi". As Susanna, Karg moves effortlessly from the spirited girl of Act 1 -- there's some delightfully playful decoration to the last phrases of the second duet -- to a tender, womanly account of "Deh vieni". She blends perfectly with the Countess in the Letter Duet.

Angela Brower, a soprano-sounding mezzo, is a spirited, coltish Cherubino. He shows some deftness and grace. He allows some lilt. He favors the fast and punchy -- but he is not the Energizer Bunny. He is lean, pliant, smooth, accurate, and personable. He is well-nigh instrumental no offense to singers. He is almost an ideal Mozartean in opera. Christiane Karg, the German soprano, is Susanna, and she sings beautifully.

It keeps going: rhythmic drive is not lacking, as the overture and Act 3 dance sequence particularly demonstrate, which is not a minor virtue. Von Otter proves to be an unusually sympathetic, attractively-voiced Marcellina.

Bulgarian soprano Sonya Yoncheva makes for a most affecting broken-hearted Countess early on in her Act II aria and adds an alluring "Dove sono" later. Maurizio Muraro bring an imposing comic bass to Dr. The presence of an audience is hardly noticeable except for a bare handful of muted collective laughs -- and praise be at a time of cost-cutting in the twilight of the CD era, the thick page booklet contains a full libretto! October The singers are to be commended for the alert realism of their recitatives and their interactive characterisations.

Thomas Hampson is a rock-steady Count. Sonya Yoncheva gives the Countess some real passion in "Dove sono" and elsewhere. Luca Pisaroni's Figaro is confident and spirited. Thomas Hampson is the Count, one of his best roles, and to his credit he sounds much the same as in It's a carefully considered performance.

Christina Karg, a new luminary in the great succession of pure-voiced lighter German sopranos, gives the best performance here, elegantly vocalized and endearingly characterized. The young American mezzo Angela Brower is an appealing Cherubino. She's splendid in her first aria. Maurizio Muraro is a deep voiced basso buffo, who wisely goes for bluster, not refinement.

In sum, this performance is a very high-level ensemble effort. It is beautifully recorded, and I look forward to returning to it in the future. The singing is universally excellent -- Sonya Yoncheva's Contessa is passionate and glowing, one of the best portrayals in years. Likewise Luca Pisaroni's Figaro may be the standard for the youthful century.

Thomas Hampson's third Conte is more reflective, less declamatory, a burnished and well-considered performance. Christiane Karg does fine work as Susanna, with no noticeable weakness and much spot-on emotional fervency. There is much, much to enjoy in this performance. Great fun, expertly rendered.

It features singers who combine vocal accomplishment with musical and dramatic intelligence. Pisaroni relishes articulating his native language; every word of da Ponte's libretto is a delight. Christiane Karg is a good match for him. The Countess is Sonya Yoncheva, who so naturally conveys vulnerability that just her vocal tone makes the character's plight tangible.

Yoncheva produces one of the most beautiful sounds in opera today, making her performance as sensuously enjoyable as it is affecting.

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Angela Brower, as Cherubino, deploys an appealing lyric mezzo of so bright a tinge that you could mistake her for a soprano. She nicely distinguishes her two arias. Von Otter's intact virtues as a singing musician justify the inclusion of her Act IV aria, a moment of delight. But the show belongs to Nezet-Seguin, who offers a reading so well gauged, and so bursting with life, that it continually provoked me to think, "What a wonderful opera!

Soulignons d'abord, la prestation superlative vocalement et dramatiquement de la soprano vedette de la production. Inoubliable incarnation. Avec la soprano allemande Christiane Karg Susanna , c'est la confirmation d'un talent. De la belle ouvrage! Related albums. Release 08 Jul. Coro: "Ricevete, o padroncina" Vocalensemble Rastatt July August The Chamber Orchestra of Europe is marvelous -- the strings silky but capable of sharp-edged attacks, the winds alternately spicy and sweet, and their ensemble work impeccable.

August The most striking quality of this "Figaro" is the transparency of the orchestral sound, enabled by DG's use of multiple, closely placed mics. August It features a stellar cast. September The COE play beautifully. September A stellar cast impresses in Baden-Baden. October Von Otter proves to be an unusually sympathetic, attractively-voiced Marcellina. November November The singing is universally excellent -- Sonya Yoncheva's Contessa is passionate and glowing, one of the best portrayals in years.

December